Just a Little Lefse*

Not long after I was assigned to the Southwestern Minnesota Synod, I had a realization that chilled me to the bone.

If we stayed in Minnesota for more than few years, my as yet unborn child would learn to play not “Duck, Duck, Goose” but “Duck, Duck, Gray Duck.”  (Pro Tip: all you Minnesotans are playing this game wrong.)

Luckily, Minnesota has other cultural delights.  Yesterday, Zoe got to experience a great one:

Lefse-making with some of the ladies at Beckville.  Zoe and I were not much help–I bagged the completed lefse while she ate candy corn, rearranged paper cups and toothpicks, and caused one piece of uncooked lefse to hit the floor.  You’re welcome, lefse makers!

This kind of cooking requires way more precision than either of us can handle.  I was mostly in it for the fellowship.  And the chance to taste some broken pieces hot off the griddle.  I can now confirm that this lefse is delicious, and everyone should come buy it at Beckville’s Fancy Cookie Sale on December 3rd.

See?  I helped.

*The post title was inspired by my dim memory of this song, which is actually anti-lefse (and pretty silly, as any song about lefse is bound to be).

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7 Comments

Filed under Baking with Beckville, Taste and See

7 responses to “Just a Little Lefse*

  1. Nora turns out to have a great skill at turning lefse. She likely got it from her grandpa Ole, who, in his senior citizen years, makes it every year with the Sons of Norway in Tucson, Arizona. Actually, he never did it as a child because that was ‘women’s work’, but he’s got a deft hand. I’m thinking about getting him his own lefse stick for turning, but that might be a bit too frivolous for such a frugal Norwegian.

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  2. Liz L.

    What’s Lefse for us non-Minnesotans?

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    • Well, for non-Minnesotans (or non-Lutherans), here is a wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lefse

      Basically, it is a sort of flatbread made from potato, milk / cream, and flour. It’s very thin and round like a tortilla, usually served with butter and maybe sugar or jam. Of course, you can put anything on it, or just sneak it hot from the griddle!

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  3. mandatruchinski

    My favorite part of this post is the inexplicable picture of the Crazy Horse model that accompanies the song.

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